a service of the Nevada Policy Research Institute

a service of NPRI


In this issue of
BUSINESSNevada:

 We’re getting our clock cleaned

Who pays Nevada’s business taxes?

What REALLY happened in Washington State

Free
subscriptions to
BUSINESSNevada

Vol. 1, No.1

 

 

We’re getting our clock cleaned

MONTH AFTER MONTH and year after year, the Nevada business community is finding itself the main course on everybody’s dinner plate.

Why is it happening?

The answer is basically simple: Those who want ever-bigger government and ever-higher taxes on the rest of us are one-pointed. And they’re accomplishing their goals by simply staying on the offensive and organizing incessantly to expand the beachhead they’ve already built in Nevada government.

This is the reason for BUSINESSNevada – and why this first issue is being sent to you. [To learn how BUSINESSNevada intends to address the problems of the Nevada business community, click here.]
 

Ready for an $8.25
minimum wage?

YOU THOUGHT THAT the minimum-wage question on the ballot last year was just something to kick the minimum wage in Nevada up a dollar?

Many people did. But a lot more was at stake than the news media let on.

Now that same proposal—with all its many built-in booby traps—has already passed the Nevada Assembly and received its first reading in the Senate. If the Nevada business community does not weigh in quickly, and massively, the Silver State’s business climate will never be the same. [more]
 

How ‘bout a $9.12
minimum wage by 2010?

 

“TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, there are no minimum wage employees working in the manufacturing companies in Nevada with the exception of company owners,” Ray Bacon, of the Nevada Manufacturers Association, wrote Sen. Randolph Townsend and the state Senate’s labor committee this week.

“During start up periods or periods of recessions, company owners often go without pay for some period of time.  We don’t believe you have the authority to dictate that an owner must pay himself.  Just as an owner can exempt him- or herself from workers compensation coverage, we suggest the same should apply to this bill.”

Ray’s point-by-point analysis of the minimum wage legislation backed by the Nevada State AFL-CIO, Assembly Bill 87, is posted in BN’s Business Intelligence section. Here are some of his projections of future minimum wages in Nevada, based on provisions in AB 87:

Year

NV Min Wg

Fed. min Wg

NV Min Wg with fed

2006

6.15

6.55

6.55 + 1.40 = 7.95

2007

6.33

7.25

7.25 + 2.10 = 8.35

2008

6.52

7.25

8.35 x 1.03 = 8.60

2009

6.72

7.25

.60 x 1.03 = 8.86

2010

6.92

7.25

9.12

2011

7.13

7.25

9.4

Check out Ray’s full letter, posted in BusinessNevada’s Insider section.

 


Subscribe to BUSINESSNevada