a service of the Nevada Policy Research Institute




 Education
Homogenizing failure

How the educational experience
gets spoiled

By Steven Miller
BusinessNevada

When milk is homogenized, it’s mechanically forced through tiny channels that reduce the molecules of cream to sub-micron size. This disperses them throughout the milk and prevents cream from rising to the top.

In Nevada school districts, also, mechanisms are in place to prevent the cream from rising to the top.

Some teachers, research has repeatedly shown, are much more effective educators of students — regularly producing a lot more genuine student progress than do their colleagues. Yet for decades Nevada school districts have sold them out, refusing to pay them more, other considerations equal, than the most mediocre.

[continued]


Relocation
Nevada strikes a
nerve in New Jersey

By Stephanie Tavares
InBusiness Las Vegas

Dozens of out-of-state businesses relocate to Nevada every year.

That is not a coincidence. The Nevada Development Authority and individual municipalities recruit heavily in neighboring states, trying to attract the most promising companies to grow the tax base and increase employment.

Luring small businesses away from their birthplaces is something most states attempt, but few have had the success of Nevada. More than 250 companies have moved here from other states since 2001 and 11 others have opened facilities here as part of a multistate expansion.

[continued]


Politicians
Ex-governors
flog for clients

Hiring out as lobbyists & spokesmen

By Benjamin Spillman
Las Vegas Review-Journal

Former politicians used to making the news took turns fighting for the right to sell papers -- as well as cigarettes, magazines and souvenirs -- from a proposed newsstand at McCarran International Airport.

Former Nevada Gov. Bob Miller and former U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan took turns in front of the Clark County Commission on Tuesday arguing on behalf of two companies vying for the right to operate a concession stand at the nation's sixth-busiest airport.

[continued]


Surveillance
Harrah’s expands
the use of RFID

Sticks electronic ID tags
on waitresses, others

By Valerie Miller
LV Business Press

Harrah's Entertainment is testing innovations in player tracking in Las Vegas but gamblers aren't the only ones being monitored. The company's use of radio-frequency identification tags on cocktail waitresses and other servers at The Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino is going into its second year and the company plans to make further use of the electronic tags.

[continued]


Real estate
Report: Number of
RE agents to shrink

By Brian Wargo
InBusiness Las Vegas

A doubling of real estate agents and brokers in Nevada between 2001 and 2006 is more than the industry can handle and there are indications a number of them are leaving the industry, according to a report by the Nevada Association of Realtors.

The number of real estate agents in Nevada has outpaced demand for their services, and the profession will see a dwindling in its ranks over the next two years, according to the report compiled by the Las Vegas consulting firm Applied Analysis.

[continued]


Currencies
Dollar plummets

Drops to a 2-year low against euro

By Isabelle Lindenmayer
Wall Street Journal

The dollar sank to a two-year low against the euro after the Federal Reserve softened its rate-increase bias and backpedalled from previous upbeat comments on growth and inflation.

[continued] This article will be available to non-subscribers of the Online Journal for up to seven days after it is e-mailed.


Bubbles
Mortgage meltdown

By Andy Laperriere
Wall Street Journal

Stock markets world-wide have sold off the past few weeks over concerns the collapse of the subprime mortgage industry could prolong and deepen the housing slump and threaten the health of the U.S. economy.

Federal Reserve officials and most economists believe the problems in the subprime mortgage market will remain relatively contained, but there is compelling evidence that the failure of subprime loans may be the start of a painful unwinding of a housing bubble that was fueled by easy money and loose lending practices.

[continued] This article will be available to non-subscribers of the Online Journal for up to seven days after it is e-mailed.


 

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A service of NPRI

March 23, 2007
Vol. 3, No. 3

Also in this issue:

Nevada strikes a
nerve in New Jersey

Ex-governors
flog for clients

Harrah’s expands
the use of RFID

Report: Number of
RE agents to shrink

Dollar plummets

Mortgage meltdown

Commentary:

A better way than the TSA

The media likes scaring us,
and we like it too

Fleckenstein on the Fed

The phoniest scandal
of the century (so far)

 

Recently from NPRI:
Seriously 'at risk': CCSD statistics

Performance for most kids actually declines under full-day kindergarten.
 

[The article]

 

Travel
A better way than the TSA

Private security firms would actually keep us safe, not just make us feel that way.

By Becky Akers
Christian Science Monitor

The Improving America's Security Act recently passed by Congress allows the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) airport screeners to unionize. This bill could add about 50,000 dues-paying members to union rolls while breathing new life into TSA's unofficial slogan: Thousands Standing Around.

[continued]

Predation

The media likes scaring us, and we like it too

By John Stossel
Creators Syndicate

I'm embarrassed by my profession.

We consumer reporters should warn you about life's important risks, but instead, we mislead you about dubious risks.

I first started thinking about this when interviewing Ralph Nader years ago, before he stopped speaking to me. Nader worried about almost everything: Food? "It can spoil in your own refrigerator," Chicken? "[It's] contaminated with pesticides, herbicides, fungicides."

[continued]

This mess will only get worse

The looming subprime collapse threatens the entire conomy

By Bill Fleckenstein
MSN Money

Bubbles have a way of masking what would otherwise be self-evident truths. And, as the credit bubble in real estate dies a dramatic, not-pretty death, a very simple truth has resurfaced: It's not a viable business when you lend money to people you know can't pay it back. If the late, "great" subprime sector had a tombstone, that would be a fitting epitaph for New Century Financial and others.

[continued]

Politics
The phoniest scandal of the century (so far)

By Dick Morris
DickMorris.com

When willthe Bush administration grow some guts? Except for its resolute -- read: stubborn -- position on Iraq, the White House seems incapable of standing up for itself and battling for its point of view. The Democratic assault on the administration over the dismissal of United States attorneys is the most fabricated and phony of scandals, but the Bush people offer only craven apologies, half-hearted defenses, and concessions.

[continued]



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